My Weeks as a PWD: Part 1

I have always been a clumsy girl ever since I could remember.  Sometimes, I could just walk in a perfectly flat surface and suddenly I fall flat to the ground. I hope I was kidding but it’s true. My father expressed once that the mere fact that I was walking alone make him worry at times and I cannot blame him. After a long day at work, he’ll arrive home discovering that I bruised myself badly because I got hit on something or had a big wound while playing outside or because I broke some glasses and injured myself while trying to pick up the pieces.

November 9 came and I was absent-mindedly walking down the stairs while talking to my mom on the second floor. I just missed one, freaking step then all of the sudden all pain—physical, emotional, moral…you name it pain—were concentrated on one part of my body, my right foot. It was so excruciating that I couldn’t move for minutes. All I could do is lean on the wall and wail quietly. When I had the strength, I move through the living room and just rested my foot there. It was odd, though. It was extremely painful but I observed that my right foot only swelled a little. “Damn, sprain.” I thought. I had a sprain before though but the experience was a little different; swelled massively just moments after I tripped in the Gateway Mall in Cubao. When I felt a little stronger, I washed myself and went straight to bed.

The next morning came, my right foot was still in pain but physically, no significant change could be observed. I could still walk although my movements were slow. The throbbing in my right foot made me limping. However, I noticed that it was particularly painful whenever I pace down the stairs. Since it was my house, I decided to pace down the stairs, sitting down. I applied some cold compress before going to school but I wore my usual leather shoes. I managed to go normally albeit dragging myself to school because not only was I in great discomfort but my class starts on 9AM and my Friday class ends on 9PM.  Let me stress that my school is in Sampaloc, Manila while I live in Fairview, Quezon City. Anyway, my classmates hardly noticed some changes in my movements. Our professor did not come in for our class so my classmate and I decided to go home. We walk from UE until Espana Boulevard together. When we were approaching the elevator, I told the elevator girl, “Teka lang, Ate. Sorry mabagal ako. May sprain ako.” (“Wait, miss. I’m sorry for my slowness. I have sprain.”). My classmate apologized to me that she did not notice any difference with the way I walk and asked why I did not bind my aching right foot. I told her that I didn’t know how to. She insisted on binding my foot. I was reluctant at first because I don’t want her to go touching my foot but I eventually gave in. When we bought the bind from a local drugstore, I noticed that bruises started appearing on the right side of my right foot and my pinky and little toe. What really shocked me was I even have a big bruise on the palm of my foot. I never had a bruise there. After binding it, I said my goodbye to her and went to my cousin’s coffee shop and met waited for my best friend. When I got home by afternoon, I’ve noticed that the color of my bruises intensified from light purple to deep, dark plum.

The next morning, after going to church, I had my uncle check it. I’m telling you that he is one of the best doctors around. Like there’s one time when he merely looked at a person’s throat and told him he probably has cancer and it turns out after series of tests that my uncle is unfortunately correct. In my case, one look at my foot and he told me that I probably have a fracture and recommended me to undergo x-ray. I was scared. I know that you can easily scratch off that key word “probably” when he is speaking. But one part of me refused to believe him because my foot is starting to feel better. I hoped for the best that it was merely a sprain.

But I think I am not the one born to overrule my uncle’s initial findings.

On the next day, I received my roentgenographic report:

                RIGHT FOOT:

                Shows complete displaced oblique fracture of the 5th metatarsal shaft with underlying soft tissue.

I called my uncle and he immediately referred me to an orthopedic. When I met him finally he told me this strange instruction:

“You need to wear rubber shoes and walk with two clutches for THREE WEEKS and then you’ll have your check up again.”

And I was thinking only three letters on my head: W. T. H.

Enabled. As much as possible, my right foot was not allowed to step on the ground. I was helped greatly by my friend, Abel. Yes, my clutch has a name.
Enabled. As much as possible, my right foot was not allowed to step on the ground. I was helped greatly by my friend, Abel. Yes, my clutch has a name.

…to be continued…

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4 thoughts on “My Weeks as a PWD: Part 1

    1. Hahaha…oh my, I have not finished this post yet because of my home works. I’ll discuss it in my next post but yes, it’s okay now. However, I am still not allowed to run, wear heels or jump until January ends. 🙂

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